Our Future Home

Quadrangle Residence Hall will be demolished in the summer of 2016 to make way for the new $96.3 million College of Pharmacy building. The total enterprise on the main UI campus will have 296,000 square feet compared to today's 152,500.

The building is expected to be move-in ready by early 2020.

  • The first two floors of the student-centric building will be mainly devoted to academics. The total enterprise will have 23 learning spaces, which includes classrooms, lecture halls and conference/seminar rooms—ten more than today. Many of these will be small-group workspaces that can be arranged as needed to meet a variety of learning needs. This portion of the building was designed to complement the transformative, patient-focused, and student-centered Learning and Living Curriculum, which kicked off in fall of 2015.
  • The new building will boast a distinctive, 128-seat Team Based Learning Lecture Hall with a design that is unique to campus. Students will be able to easily maneuver around to collaborate within teams and easily access power. Three 220-inch projection screens will be placed at the center and sides of the lecture hall.
  • Laboratory science research spaces, located on the fourth and fifth floors of the new building, are designed with a "hybrid" approach where they are open to each other, but still contained as individual modules by support spaces. Support spaces are adjacent to the research need. There will be 16 collaborative laboratory science research spaces, in the new building and 27 in the total enterprise. Modules are specially designed for synthetic chemistry, biological, and other types of research.
  • Computational research laboratories will primarily be on the third floor. There will be four small group collaboration rooms, two medium-sized group rooms to seat up to 12 people, and a 24-seat conference room. The open collaborative space will have up to 50 work stations. There will also be two shared secured offices. 
  • This forward-looking space will help Iowa pharmacy take the lead in offering innovative and accessible educational opportunities for all of its students. Elements of universal design principles will be included. In select spaces, built-in hearing loops will broadcast directly to a person's hearing aid. Each floor will have a color associated with it—but used sparingly—to help visitors find their way.